Flourishing Cabarete Flora

by admin, March 30, 2016

Cabarete flora and fauna is enough to make the most loyal plant aficionado or seasoned bird watcher go totally wild (pun intended). Visitors are often curious about the local plants and flowers, so we have rounded up some of the most beautiful and intriguing tropical plants and fruit trees that you will likely see during your stay in Cabarete. The best way to find these amazing plants and trees is to go exporing. So fill up your water bottles, lace up your sneakers, and get outside!

Coralillo

cabarete flora coralillo

Coralillo trees look like they are completely engulfed in flames, but upon closer inspection, you will realize that it is actually bright orange flowers. Coralillo’s are native to India, but their cultivation spread to the tropics a few hundred years ago. There is a trail between Playa Encuentro and Kite Beach that follows the ocean where you can find Coralillo trees and other gorgeous cacti and tropical plants lining the dirt road. If you want to check it out, catch a moto taxi to Encuentro. Then follow the coral and dirt road back towards Cabarete. The walk takes approximately 45 minutes, perhaps an hour if you’re snapping lots of photos and literally stopping to smell the flowers! The best time of day to go is evening, around 5pm, as the light is dappled and gorgeous, and you will arrive back at Kite Beach for happy hour.

Trinitaria

cabarete flora trinitaria

Trinitaria, also known as Bougainvillea, can been seen hugging roads, climbing over fences and used as an ornamental bush in many gardens. They are absolutely stunning, and many people associate the bright flowers of Trinitaria with the tropics. If you want to see some Trinitaria, go for a stroll in the Callejon, which is the Dominican neighborhood right in the middle of Cabarete. Dominican families love planting them around their houses for the shade they provide, and the results are picture-perfect. Brightly colored flowers framing charming houses in every pastel color of the rainbow, children playing and people hanging out listening to music. Going for a walk through the Callejon is a great way to catch a glimpse into everyday life of the DR away from the hustle and bustle of the beach.

Guanabana

cabarete flora guanabana

Guanabana is a tropical fruit tree that produces a large green oval fruit that can weigh up to 10lbs. The surface is irregular and spiky, and looks like a dragon’s egg. The flesh of the guanabana tastes creamy and sweet, with a custard like flavor and texture. If it is your first time in Cabarete, we highly recommend seeking out a guanabana- it is a flavor experience like nothing you have ever tried before! We have heard them compared to creme brulee and vanilla gelato. If that doesn’t pique your interest, we aren’t sure what will! You can buy these delicious fruits from the grocery store, or most fruit stands along the main road. Champola de guanabana is a delicious drink made from guanabana pulp, milk and sugar, and is a favorite treat in the Dominican Republic- it tastes like a natural, fruity milk shake and we promise you’ll fall in love with your first sip!

Cajuil

cabarete-plants-cajuil

The cajuil is a tropical fruit tree that blooms in the winter time, with exceptionally beautiful fluffy pink flowers. It is closely related to the cashew fruit tree. The fruit looks from afar like an apple, with a shiny red skin. The flesh is mild flavored, with an extremely high water content. If you find a cajui tree laden with fruit, pick ones that are soft to the touch and deep red in color. They are so refreshing on a hot day. The perfect healthy treat while you are out exploring! We have tried cajuil fruit jam as well, and it is just as delicious as it sounds. Cajuil season is early Spring, so with any luck you’ll find a tree bursting with these little beauties during your time in Cabarete!

 

*We know there is much more Cabarete flora than we mentioned in this article, so feel free to share your favorite Cabarete flora in the comments below.

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